The Hearts in David's Eyes

In the early morning hours, on our departure day from the villa, I found myself on the road back to Florence because I’d signed up for an early morning tour of the Academia Galleria to see Michelangelo’s David sculpture.  I arranged the tour through Viator, which offered a skip-the-line tour with a coupon for a free Italian breakfast.

So off I went, on the road at 5am and arriving back in Florence a little before 7am.  I was to meet the tour guide at 8am, so had a quick breakfast consisting of espresso and an Italian pastry (that’s the customary breakfast) and then met up my guide.  We were a group of just under 15 and our guide was not only well-versed in Italian art history, but she was also a native Forentine.

David is obviously the big draw and also the main reason I wanted to see this well-known work of art.  All of the photos were taken with my 16-55mm f/2.8 lens.  There’s no flash photography allowed at all in the museum, so I had to rely on the IBIS of the X-H1 to help keep things steady.

Here’s a shot of the statute itself.  I find it so amazing that Michelangelo was able to envision this statue in a large mound of rock.  Even more amazing is the depiction of the muscles.

Probably most interesting of all, and the blog’s title mentions it, is that David’s pupils are actually hearts.  I did a double-take when I heard our guide say that and had to try to verify it myself.  My 16-55mm f/2.8 lens is the equivalent of a 24-70mm lens if used on a full frame, so I didn’t have the reach, but would at least have the sharpness, so I snapped what photos I could before moving on in the museum.

What follows are a succession of cropped images, moving in closer and closer until…

Voila! There really are hearts carved into David’s eyes!

I couldn’t tell how big the hearts were, but it doesn’t matter.  The level of detail that Michelangelo instilled into this sculpture is amazing.  He was a true visionary, able to see it in his mind’s eye before creating it in the physical world.  That’s true talent.

I’ll leave you with one more shot.

Most people just focus on the statue itself, but there’s so many other elements surrounding it, such as the skylight above.  The lines complement the statue.  A piece of art from the olden days set amongst the architecture of the modern.