Tuscany 2018 - Day Two

After an amazing first day of the workshop with Damien Lovegrove and Terez Kocova, I had wondered how the second day would compare. I was not disappointed!

Our second day began with a boudoir shoot in one of the rooms at the villa. I’d never done a boudoir shoot before, so was apprehensive about it because it was new to me. And while I’ve gotten into people’s personal space before while taking photos, it wasn’t a boudoir theme. But Damien, as he did the day before, led the session with much thoughtfulness and care.

This first shot of Terez led off the session.

ISO 200 * 35mm f/1.4 lens * f/1.4 * 1/180 sec

The above and below shots were lit by all natural light. It may look like there was a speedlight used, but that’s because I burned the corners of the image using the vignette preset in Lightroom. I chose black and white because — well — because Damien did. The color image I took looked pretty good, but after seeing Damien’s version of it in black and white, I decided to imitate him.

ISO 200 * 35mm f/1.4 lens * f/1.4 * 1/350 sec

For this next shot, Damien had Terez lower the straps of her nightgown, and then by pulling the sheet up in such a way, it gives the impression that she’s naked underneath. Damien described it to Terez as her being asleep, naked under the sheets, when suddenly her friends entered the room and surprised her.

ISO 200 * 35mm f/1.4 lens * f/1.4 * 1/220 sec

Again, it’s all natural light. Beautiful, eh? Natural is just stunning!

This next image though appears to be my most popular one on Instagram.

ISO 200 * 35mm f/1.4 lens * f/1.4 * 1/60 sec

Damien had Terez stand in front of the mirror and that’s really all it took to make the shot.  It’s again all natural light coming through a window to Terez’s right.  The mirror was angled just a little bit so that we could capture Terez and her reflection without obstruction.  I really love this shot for its simplicity in design, but complexity in composition.  By complexity, I mean there’s foreground interest (Terez), background interest (her reflection), and balance in the shot such that everything is harmonious in terms of placement and spacing.  Of course, I didn’t realize that at the time.  I was just consciously thinking of framing and trying to get a quick shot since we were all taking turns.

One thing Damien shared with me — well, it was one of many things over those days, but I really remembered this bit of advice — was to trust my little 35mm f/1.4 lens. This lens has the equivalent field of view of a 53mm lens on a full frame camera.  The reason he told me to trust this lens is because the focal length allowed me to get really close to my subject, at basically a conversational distance.  Being that close helps with the intimacy of the moment, and that’s what’s important when it comes to boudoir.  I’m still digesting that to this day.

After completing the boudoir session, it was lunchtime, and then we headed off to an abandoned farmhouse for more shots.

ISO 200 * 16-55mm f/2.8 lens @ 55mm * f/2.8 * 1/30 sec

It may not look like it, but the above shot was again done with natural window light.  The light source (the sun) was so strong as it was coming through and being shaped by the window that it could almost have been mistaken for either the Lupo Superpanel or the Godox AD600.  The texture behind Terez is absolutely marvelous.  And the shadows that fall across her face and upper body are well defined.

ISO 200 * 16-55mm f/2.8 lens @ 25.7mm * f/2.8 * 1/125 sec

For the above shot, we did use the Lupo Superpanel as a lighting source.  It’s located directly in front of Terez.  The light from the window above her head acts as more of a part of the scene rather than a light source.  It’s too high up, and she’s too close to the wall for it to actually serve as a backlight. 

While that ended the day, there were a lot more shots taken than displayed in this posting.  But those photos are art nudes.  In fact, there were even art nude shots taken on the first day as well.  It wasn’t exploitative in any way, but I like to keep this blog family-friendly.