The Free Press -- A Concert at the Cadillac Hotel

More fun at the Cadillac Hotel, this time with a band known as The Free Press!

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One of the beautiful things about the concerts at the Cadillac Hotel is that it attracts singers and bands who have been established in the Bay Area for a while, and also bands that are just getting started.  Most important, the concerts are free, so these musicians are donating their time to bring some life to the hotel and to the residents who live there.

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This concert gave me a chance to finally test my Fuji XH-1 and the camera's In Body Image Stabilization (IBIS).  Since I've only used prime lenses for shoots at the Cadillac Hotel, the IBIS would come into play since none of my prime lenses have any type of image stabilization, and Fuji's 16-55mm f/2.8 lens -- which on a full frame would have the same field of field as a 24-70mm -- lacks the image stabilization as well.

Here we have lead singer, Christie Harbinski, really diving deep into the emotion of the song.

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For the above image, the IBIS didn't come into play because of the bright background, but in the next shot, I was able to drop the shutter speed considerably.  You can see that the pianist's face is really sharp while his hands are in motion.

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The general rule I've always been taught about working with primes on a non-IBIS body is that the shutter speed should be twice the focal length to avoid hand-shake, although one pro photographer recently told me it should be four times the focal length.  I've been able to get away with maybe 1.75 times the focal length, but that's been risky.  Of course, the downside to a high shutter speed is a darker image.  Thus far, the Fuji's dynamic range is good enough that there aren't too many images that Lightroom can't handle, but the result tends to be either a grainer image or loss of color at the expense of exposure.

This next shot of the guitarist was taken as he was warming up.  At this point, I don't think he wasn't actually aware that I had gotten this close to him, but I saw this look and had to capture it.

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I've been tilting the camera a lot lately, per the advice of a friend who learned his technique while he was a combat photographer in the Navy.  It doesn't just change the perspective, but it does something else: sometimes there are lines that you want vertical or horizontal that the eye would find pleasing.  Like in the next shot where the saxophone is vertical.

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I converted the above photo to black and white because the colors were too distracting, and I just wanted the focus to be the saxophone and the man playing it, with further focus on the sax itself since it has the defined vertical line.

This next photo was one of those instances where one of the spotlights was hitting the wall behind the pianist / drummer.  (Amazing that he's doing both!)  I had to move quickly to take this shot because all of the band members were moving. 

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And here's our final shot.  I put a little extra work into this one in post-processing because it was such a lovely image and vignette keeps our focus on her.

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Definitely looking forward to hearing more from this band in the future!  Check out their website for booking info and more on the band itself!