The Free Press -- A Concert at the Cadillac Hotel

More fun at the Cadillac Hotel, this time with a band known as The Free Press!

ISO 200 56mm f/1.2 lens f/1.2 1/900sec

One of the beautiful things about the concerts at the Cadillac Hotel is that it attracts singers and bands who have been established in the Bay Area for a while, and also bands that are just getting started.  Most important, the concerts are free, so these musicians are donating their time to bring some life to the hotel and to the residents who live there.

ISO 1600 90mm f/2 lens f/2 1/125sec

This concert gave me a chance to finally test my Fuji XH-1 and the camera's In Body Image Stabilization (IBIS).  Since I've only used prime lenses for shoots at the Cadillac Hotel, the IBIS would come into play since none of my prime lenses have any type of image stabilization, and Fuji's 16-55mm f/2.8 lens -- which on a full frame would have the same field of field as a 24-70mm -- lacks the image stabilization as well.

Here we have lead singer, Christie Harbinski, really diving deep into the emotion of the song.

ISO 200 56mm f/1.2 lens f/1.2 1/900sec

For the above image, the IBIS didn't come into play because of the bright background, but in the next shot, I was able to drop the shutter speed considerably.  You can see that the pianist's face is really sharp while his hands are in motion.

ISO 320 56mm f/1.2 lens f/1.2 1/80sec

The general rule I've always been taught about working with primes on a non-IBIS body is that the shutter speed should be twice the focal length to avoid hand-shake, although one pro photographer recently told me it should be four times the focal length.  I've been able to get away with maybe 1.75 times the focal length, but that's been risky.  Of course, the downside to a high shutter speed is a darker image.  Thus far, the Fuji's dynamic range is good enough that there aren't too many images that Lightroom can't handle, but the result tends to be either a grainer image or loss of color at the expense of exposure.

This next shot of the guitarist was taken as he was warming up.  At this point, I don't think he wasn't actually aware that I had gotten this close to him, but I saw this look and had to capture it.

ISO 200 56mm f/1.2 lens f/1.2 1/120sec

I've been tilting the camera a lot lately, per the advice of a friend who learned his technique while he was a combat photographer in the Navy.  It doesn't just change the perspective, but it does something else: sometimes there are lines that you want vertical or horizontal that the eye would find pleasing.  Like in the next shot where the saxophone is vertical.

ISO 200 56mm f/1.2 lens f/1.2 1/90sec

I converted the above photo to black and white because the colors were too distracting, and I just wanted the focus to be the saxophone and the man playing it, with further focus on the sax itself since it has the defined vertical line.

This next photo was one of those instances where one of the spotlights was hitting the wall behind the pianist / drummer.  (Amazing that he's doing both!)  I had to move quickly to take this shot because all of the band members were moving. 

ISO 200 56mm f/1.2 lens f/1.2 1/125sec

And here's our final shot.  I put a little extra work into this one in post-processing because it was such a lovely image and vignette keeps our focus on her.

ISO 100 56mm f/1.2 lens f/1.2 1/40sec

Definitely looking forward to hearing more from this band in the future!  Check out their website for booking info and more on the band itself!

An Unexpected Visitor

How often do you get this lucky?

ISO 200   50-140mm f/2.8 lens at 140mm   f/2.8   1/680sec

I don't remember what I was doing at the time, but I just happened to look out the back window of my apartment and outside was this massive bird, a Great Blue Heron.  It just stood there, looking at something.  I'm not sure what it was looking at.  It could have been a gopher, but if there was one, I didn't see it.

I quickly grabbed my X-T2 and mounted the XF 50-140mm f/2.8 lens, which has the equivalent field of view of a 70-200mm on a full frame camera.

The bird stood still for me for several minutes while I snapped its photo.  Have a look at the detail of the above image, now cropped.

ISO 200   50-140mm f/2.8 lens at 140mm   f/2.8   1/680sec

Amazing detail, eh?  I'm continually impressed by the sharpness of the Fuji glass.  The beauty of the heron’s feathers — especially the lines — are amazing!

Here's one more, just before my friend took off into the sky...

ISO 200   50-140mm f/2.8 lens at 140mm   f/2.8   1/1250sec

I'm not sure if this is a fighting stance or what...  But the heron wasn't looking directly at anyone in particular that I could tell.  There was no one directly in front of it, but something got it to ruffle its feathers!

Hopefully this heron will come back once in a while for more shots!

Grant Levin Trio at the Cadillac Hotel

We’re back to the Cadillac Hotel again, this time with the Grant Levin Trio!   

As always, I like to set up the piece with the tools of the trade... 

ISO 500   56mm f/1.2 lens   f/1.2   1/125sec

ISO 800   90mm f/2 lens   f/2   1/125sec

And here’s Grant Levin himself!  I wasn't sure who he was at first because when I looked at his website, prior to the concert date, he had longer hair and a much thicker beard.

ISO 500   56mm f/1.2 lens   f/1.2   1/160sec

The above shot was actually taken as Grant was warming up before the concert.  I always like to do shots like the above while the musicians are warming up because it helps me get the lighting and color temperature right.  The lighting configuration at the Cadillac Hotel tends to shift around each time based on how many musicians and singers are performing, so it's always good to do several tests because some of your performers could end up in areas of too much light or too many shadows.

ISO 800   90mm f/2 lens   f/2   1/160sec

As you can see as well, I'm once again shooting at a fixed shutter speed of higher than 1/125th sec in order to freeze motion and prevent camera shake.  Those shutter speeds seem to work the best for me, regardless of which prime lens I use.  And then in post-processing, I'll adjust the exposure so that all photos will match.  If you compare the above two photos -- it's very subtle -- you can actually see the light fall-off / differential between the 56mm and the 90mm, thus necessitating the need for a little exposure compensation during post-processing.

(Side note:  I am so tempted right now to get the Fuji X-H1 because of its IBIS capabilities, but we'll see if the budget and common sense will overrule the G.A.S. (aka Gear Acquisition Syndrome))

Next,  we have the drummer whose name I actually didn't get.  I was amazed at how quickly he set up his drum set and started playing.  Thankfully he had a nice, even pool of light around him so that my X-T2 didn't have to hunt too hard for focus

ISO 800   90mm f/2 lens   f/2   1/125sec

A view from the top!  I've found that whenever I try to get a shot from up above, the colors don't always turn out the way I want.  Hence, the need for the black and white conversion.  

ISO 800   23mm f/1.4 lens   f/1.8   1/125sec

Next we have the third member of the group for the day: Effervescence.  He rolled in a little late, but immediately lit up the room with his voice.

ISO 200   56mm f/1.2 lens   f/1.2   1/125sec

Here's the final shot I took before having to leave.  There was definitely some foot-tapping going on!

ISO 500   56mm f/1.2 lens   f/1.2   1/125sec

All three of these performers -- I've been told -- live within or near the Tenderloin neighborhood.  And while the Tenderloin has a bad reputation, there's also a lot of good going on there, from rescue missions to soup kitchens to men like these who can sing and play.  And I may have failed to mention it in the past, but all of these performers donate their time; they do it for free.

That's it for now from the Cadillac Hotel, but in the coming weeks we'll have a few more blog postings on the unique musical styles that are heard there!  In fact, in a few weeks, it'll be bluegrass music from the band "Undone in Sorrow".

Vintage Travelers - Santi and Adam

I wanted to use this blog entry to continue showcasing some of the other Boho photos, but I ran across this lovely set of photos from the Vintage Traveler theme that we had during the same Meetup event.

Below we have Santi and Adam modeling in 1940s costumes.  The scene's lighting was by Dirk Dreyer of Dreyer Pictures and the styling and theme by our Meetup coordinator, Marebeth Gromer.  Though for the first shot, it was all natural light.  And the light was pretty harsh!  You can clearly see that from the shutter speed of my camera.  The X-T2's max mechanical shutter speed is 1/8000sec.  The tarmac at the airport provided some bounce lighting and filled in some of the shadows.  The look between Adam and Santi is perfect, with his indifference and her apparent rejecting of him.

ISO 200   56mm f/1.2 lens   f/1.2   1/8000sec

And, of course, in this next photo, they appear to have made up.

The below photo didn't have some artificial lighting even though it was shot in an aircraft hanger.  Again, it's natural light.  Dirk had set up lights for a group of previous models, but for this shot, the lighting was off.  As always, per Damien Lovegrove, whose lighting techniques I've been inspired by ever since I got my first camera, always shoot into the dark side of the face, which I did here.  You can see the contrasting shadows on Santi's face provide a nice counterpoint to the even lighting on Adam.  Will she?  Won't she?

ISO 200   56mm f/1.2 lens   f/1.2   1/2000sec

Gear used for the above two photos:  Fuji X-T2 with 56mm f/1.2 lens

Joel Tepper Piano Concert at the Cadillac Hotel

It's summer at the Cadillac Hotel and concert season is in full swing.  Last month, pianist Joel Tepper dropped by to entertain the residents and passersby.

One of the inherent challenges of photographing pianists is that they're always in a fixed position, unless they're talking to the audience.  So it's always a challenge to photograph them in such a way that it looks interesting.

As always, I shot the entire concert with prime lenses, specifically the Fuji 23mm, 56mm, and 90mm lenses.

In an effort to counter motion-blur, my shutter speed was fixed at 1/125sec.  ISO was set to auto, but capped at 800.  And more often than not, I shot wide open.

Camera settings have been provided for reference.

ISO 200   23mm lens   f/1.4   1/125sec

Above is the Patricia Walkup piano, over 100 years old!

ISO 800   90mm lens   f/2   1/125sec

ISO 800   56mm lens   f/6.4   1/125sec

The above image is the only one where I shot at other than wide open.  I wanted not only the details of the pianist in focus, but also the sheet music.

ISO 800   90mm lens   f/2   1/125sec

ISO 800   90mm lens   f/2   1/125sec

ISO 800   23mm lens   f/1.4   1/125sec

As always, I like photographing from the back of the concert venue because the mailboxes provide such a nice leading line.

Stay tuned for more concert photos in the next few weeks!